free html hit counter Peak Oil Debunked: 92. QUORN

Sunday, September 11, 2005

92. QUORN

This is a radical development which could greatly increase carrying capacity (i.e. the ability of the earth to feed large numbers of people using fewer resources). Quorn is mycoprotein -- a meat-like food produced by fungi from corn syrup, ammonia and air. In short, it is protein grown in vats. It is vastly more efficient as a protein source than the chicken or cow. Its production requires far less water and land than conventional protein, and it produces less waste. Furthermore, it is a viable commercial product, right now.
QUORN

I've tried this stuff, and it was quite good. The response was also positive at a taste test at Wired Magazine:
For about an hour on Thursday, the office went a bit Quorn crazy, with 10 or so people popping into the coffee bar to taste this advanced food. The feedback was mostly positive. Everyone liked it, and some people said they loved it. Several said that the nuggets were indistinguishable from chicken, and others said that while they could taste a difference, they thought Quorn was very similar to meat.Source
More mycoprotein facts:
Many attempts have been made to manufacture foods that are rich in protein as cheaper alternatives to meat. Microorganisms can be made to grow on some industrial or agricultural waste materials (e.g. paper, wood sugar-refining waste) that contain the right balance of nutrients. They can produce protein rapidly and efficiently. In addition, protein products from microorganisms, such as the commercially available mycoprotein Quorn, are suitable for vegetarians.Source
One calculation suggests that the protein requirements of 1 billion people could be satisfied by a vat protein facility covering only 4 square kilometers of land. (Source: How Many People Can the Earth Support?, Joel E. Cohen, P. 327).

11 Comments:

At Sunday, September 11, 2005 at 7:05:00 AM PDT, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At Sunday, September 11, 2005 at 12:20:00 PM PDT, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Quorn is really quite nice, we don't really need to eat meat at all if the truth be known..but like driving cars for most people.

 
At Sunday, September 11, 2005 at 3:48:00 PM PDT, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I haven't eaten meat for a decade. It's so unnecessary.

That Quorn stuff is nice, but you can also get protein from beans and peas and save even more energy.


Tim

 
At Monday, September 12, 2005 at 7:43:00 AM PDT, Blogger James said...

Mmmmmm! Yummy yummy quorn!

:P

P.S. Kill the spammer at the top. I've had to deal with a spam outbreak on my blog recently too!

 
At Friday, September 16, 2005 at 7:16:00 AM PDT, Anonymous EnergySpin said...

Reminds me of Soylent Green ...
But if by eating "Quorn" a significant amount of farm land could be reverted back to nature OR we were hard pressed for food then why not?
BTW the vast majority of the Western World could really use a steep caloric reduction in any case. Or else we will watch "Supersize Me 2020 " featuring Quorn McBurgers

 
At Friday, September 16, 2005 at 11:43:00 AM PDT, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I've read stories about allergic reactions to quorn:

http://www.cspinet.org/quorn/medical_research.html

 
At Sunday, December 25, 2005 at 9:43:00 AM PST, Anonymous Anonymous said...

There is nothing new about this.

"Corn smut is an extremely common disease of sweet, pop, and dent corn caused by the fungus, Ustilago zeae. In Mexico, immature smut galls are consumed as an edible delicacy known as cuitlacoche, and sweet corn smut galls have become a high value crop for some growers in the NE United States who sell them to Mexican restaurants."

What is new is your incredible lack of basic thermodynamic understanding about the real world. Dry commerical food corn (and I am not talking about sweet corn) grows, harvests, stores, ships with a mimimum of effort. Quorn requires preparation including grinding and cooking of the corn, fungal innoculation, fermenting, processing, packaging, handling, refrigeration. THIS IS MORE ENERGY INTENSIVE THEN CORN.

 
At Tuesday, July 4, 2006 at 2:43:00 PM PDT, Blogger Roland said...

Quorn requires preparation including grinding and cooking of the corn, fungal innoculation, fermenting, processing, packaging, handling, refrigeration. THIS IS MORE ENERGY INTENSIVE THEN CORN.

Well duh, but it's still far less energy-intensive than meat (which requires processing and transport of even larger amounts of corn, transport of the livestock, slaughter, packaging, transport of meat, and refrigeration).

Since you like shouting, listen to this: QUORN IS NOT A REPLACEMENT FOR CORN, IT'S A REPLACEMENT FOR MEAT!!

It's amazing how some people can totally miss the point.

 
At Tuesday, July 4, 2006 at 2:43:00 PM PDT, Blogger Roland said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At Thursday, April 10, 2008 at 2:47:00 AM PDT, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Aaah if only it actually tasted like meat.

 
At Monday, February 2, 2009 at 6:50:00 AM PST, Anonymous Green Gal said...

Just came across this post and yes it is amazing how some people can completely miss the point. The reason meat is so energy intensive is that our intensively reared animals are fed on corn. If they were fed on grass then their energy profile would be a fraction of what it is now. See the article in the Ecologist magazine: http://www.theecologist.org/pages/archive_detail.asp?comments=y&content_id=1962.

 

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